A força da gravidade e a origem do movimento

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Fernando Crêspo

Keywords

alentejano; força da gravidade; resistência e entrega; superfície de suporte; meio circundante; centro do corpo.

Resumo

No centro da ação performativa, vamos encontrar a relação que o corpo estabelece com a força da gravidade. A resistência ou entrega a esta força, a exploração do seu poder sobre o movimento e a presença da ilusão gravitacional noutras produções artísticas multidisciplinares, justificam este estudo. Aprofundam-se os momentos em que o corpo se ergue, movimenta ou é capaz de se orientar, precisamente, quando se opõe à força da gravidade, quando negoceia com esta ou quando se proprioceciona. Na variedade de superfícies de suporte – às qual o corpo se apoia, agarra, pendura, salta e desliza – encontra-se um potencial criativo que resulta da relação de resistência à força da gravidade que o corpo estabelece, num determinado momento, com estas mesmas superfícies. Apresentam-se, também, meios circundantes que transformam, de forma radical, o movimento e sua relação com a gravidade. Por fim, retorna-se ao corpo, ao centro do corpo, para aí encontrar o impulso primordial do movimento.

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